“Let us love winter, for it is the spring of genius.”

– Pietro Aretino

 

The heart of winter is upon us and while that means shorter, colder days, it doesn’t mean your productivity has to freeze. Here are seven rainy day activities to boost your productivity over winter and keep the blues away.

 

1.      Reading

We’re all so strapped for time that reading is often limited to email, social media or the menu during a brunch date with our nearest and dearest. Reading habits often become neglected in a busy lifestyle, and winter is the perfect excuse to resume a cosy habit that takes you away from the hustle and bustle of daily life. Whether it’s that historical novel that you’re halfway through or a new bestseller your friends have been raving about, a cold winter’s day is the perfect excuse to find a warm comfy spot at home and throw yourself into a gripping narrative.

 

2.      Art

As winter can be a rather bleak time with a blanket of grey cloud to accompany the chilly weather, spending some time focusing on creativity can raise your mood and add much needed colour to the greyer months. Whether it’s painting, drawing or sketching, an art project is a sure-fire way to channel some creative energy into your winter. On those days where the sky is clear, why not head into nature with some paper and pencils to sketch up a scene that inspires you?

 

3.      Declutter

No need to wait for spring to clear out those items that have been taking up unnecessary space in your home. Do you have clothes that may have been trendy years ago still taking up valuable real estate in your wardrobe, or appliances that haven’t been used since the 90s, or random pieces that no longer serve any valuable purpose and would be best donated to charity? If you’ve been putting off clearing out the pre-loved things filling up your home, rainy days are the perfect opportunity to declutter and downsize.

 

4.      Textiles and Craft

Have your craft projects been on hold for a while? A partly knitted jumper or scarf hidden away? Some cross-stitch that is incomplete? Textile projects are a great way to keep your hands busy while commanding your concentration during winter evenings. Pop some of your favourite music on and get stuck in – you’ll be surprised at how much you can produce in just a few evenings of work.

 

Rainy Day Activities - Writing5.      Writing

If you’re more inclined to work with words rather than art supplies or textiles, consider putting some time into writing. The world around us is a spring of ideas and tapping into that may give rise to something fantastic. Creative writing, poetry, memoir or short stories are just a few writing options that can be produced from the comfort of home, and drawing from imagination or life experience can yield some of the most interesting ideas.

 

6.      Languages

The idea of learning a language is often more of a fantasy than a reality due to our lives being so hectic. As winter tends to put a dampener on our social activities, we’re a bit more inclined to stay inside rather than head out. This is the perfect opportunity to look into studying a language. The increased time spent inside allows you to dedicate your time to study and when that trip to Europe comes up, you’ll be able to string together more than just simple greetings. Thirty minutes a day refreshing your knowledge will help solidify two hours of core study a week.

 

Rainy Day Activities - Baking7.      Baking

There’s nothing better than the smell of freshly baked bread, cookies, or cakes. Use a tried and tested recipe, or try your hand at something new. Baking is not only an enjoyable experience that creates warmth inside the house, you also have something delicious to impress your friends and family with (or perhaps treat yourself – you can always make more!).

 

 

Whether you’re brushing up on your skills or pursuing a new interest, there’s plenty to explore indoors with our Watercolours: Contemporary, Sewing: An Introduction,  Indonesian: Elementary 1, Intro to Creative Non-Fiction or Introduction to Basic Bread Making short courses.